For new readers just joining us, this is the fourth in a series of articles on getting your hands dirty by setting up a personal Web server and some popular Web applications. We’ve chosen a Linux server and Nginx as our operating system and Web server, respectively; we’ve given it the capability to serve encrypted pages; and we’ve added the capability to serve PHP content via PHP-FPM. Most popular Web apps, though, require a database to store some or all of their content, and so the next step is to get one spun up.

But which database? There are many, and every single one of them has its advantages and disadvantages. Ultimately we’re going to go with the MySQL-compatible replacement MariaDB, but understanding why we’re selecting this is important.

To SQL or NoSQL, that is the question

In most cases these days, when someone says “database” they’re talking about a relational database, which is a collection of different sets of data, organized into tables. An individual record in a database is stored as a row in a table of similar records—for example, a table in a business’s database might contain all of that business’s customers, with each record consisting of the customer’s first name, last name, and a customer identification number. Another table in this database might contain the states where the customers live, with each row consisting of a customer’s ID number and the state associated with it. A third table might contain all the items every customer has ordered in the past, with each record consisting of a unique order number, the ID of the customer who ordered it, and the date of the order. In each example, the rows of the table are the records, and the columns of the table are the fields each record is made of.

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via Ars Technica » Technology Lab http://feeds.arstechnica.com/~r/arstechnica/technology-lab/~3/UyNyKynr6KI/

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